John Schwoebel - Psychology 0145

Psychology

About This Program

You’re intrigued by the way people think. You’re curious about the complex connection between the brain and human behavior. You’re naturally observant and analytical, and interested in studying social interactions from a scientific perspective. Psychology may be the right major for you.

Why Utica College

The psychology major at Utica College provides a broad foundation in a discipline that applies to a variety of professional areas. It is a versatile program that enables students to gain a deeper insight into human behavior and the scientific method. With a highly accomplished faculty and excellent facilities for the study of behavior, the major in psychology offers a strong emphasis on research and numerous opportunities to gain field experience.

Papers, posters, and conference presentations

Listed below are examples of student-faculty collaborative scholarship in UC's psychology major from the year 2000 to the present.

(Note: student co-authors appear in bold-face)

Kreiger, T. C., Mendoza, A. T., Smith, A. W., Regan, K. A., Badbjevic, A., and McDermott C. M. (2019). Engaged for success? Student use of traditional and institution-based academic support. Paper presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York

Kreiger, T. C., Smith, A. W., Regan, K. A. (2019) Keeping the job and buying the stuff: Understanding the nature of “Adulting”. Poster presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York

Mendoza, A. T., Kreiger, T. C., McDermott C. M., Smith, A. W., and Regan, K. A. (2019). First-generation college students: Understanding their educational barriers, grit, and motivation. Paper presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York

Rohacek, A. and Lindsey A. E. (2019). Psychophysical assessment of contrast sensitivity functions in the sighted and hybrid forms of the Mexican Tetra fish. Poster Presentation at the Vision Science Society, St. Pete Beach, FL.

Shove, J. C. (2019). Evidence of co-rumination in a social media platform. Poster presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York

Schwoebel, J. and Regan, K. A. (2019). Enhancing recall: The role of reinstating episodic contexts in retrieval-based learning. Paper presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York

Schwoebel, J., Gawel, B. L., and Buko, D. A. (2019). Imagination: The role of reinstating episodic contexts in retrieval-based learning. Poster presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York

Rohacek, A. and Schwoebel, J. (2019). Your decisions matter! Teaching intervention improves decision making. Poster presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York

Specht, S. M. and Buko, D. A. (2019). Meaning in life, the “small self”, and liking of artwork. Poster presented at the meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, New York

Schwoebel, J., Depperman, A. K., and Scott, J. L. (2018). Distinct episodic contexts enhance retrieval-based learning. Memory 26(9), 1291-1296. doi: 10.1080/09658211.2018.1464190

Kreiger, T. C., Smith, A and Badnjevic, A. (2018). Leading a horse to water: Examining student Use of academic services. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association. Philadelphia, PA.

Schwoebel, J., Shove, J. C., Pope, A. S., and Smith, Jr., T. W. (2018). Why does retrieval in varied environmental contexts enhance learning? Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association. Philadelphia, PA.

Specht, S. M., Taurisano, A. R., Petronella, B. J. and McKinnon, S. A. (2018). Dispositional awe, “The small self” and art appreciation. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association. Philadelphia, PA.

Kupris, A. & Yanowitz, J. L. (2017). Perception of infidelity as a function of participant’s gender and previous infidelity experience. Poster presented at the annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.

Yanowitz, J. L. and Kupris, A. (2017). Perception of infidelity as a function of gender and justification. Poster presented at the annual conference of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.

Kreiger, T. C. and Scott, J. L. (2017). The relationship between levels of student nostalgia, authenticity, and college adjustment. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston, MA.

Rohacek, A. and Lindsey A. E. (2017). Terrestrial phase Tiger Salamanders have increased visual acuity compared to aquatic phase Tiger Salamanders. Poster Presented at the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.

Schwoebel, J., Depperman, A. K., and Scott, J. L. (2017). Distinct temporal and environmental contexts enhance retrieval-based learning: How to effectively cram for an exam. Poster presented at the meeting of the Association for Psychological Science, Boston, MA.

Coniguliaro, S. and Kreiger, T. C. (2016). Personality and imaginary audience. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. New York, NY.

Schwoebel, J. and Wadas, B. T. (2016). Improving long-term memory: The role of retrieval practice in different contexts. Paper presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. New York, NY.

Schwoebel, J., Pallas, B. and Dalton, A. (2015). Retrieval-based learning: Distinct retrieval practice contexts enhance long-term retention. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Philadelphia, PA.

Gibb, B. J. and Specht, S. M. (2015). The counterintuitive relationship between scores on the Southampton Nostalgia Scale and open-ended nostalgic responses. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Philadelphia, PA.

Arcuri, A. R. and Specht, S. M. (2015). Gender differences in attractiveness ratings of same- and different-gender photographs. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Philadelphia, PA.

Kreiger, T. C. and Coniguliaro, S. (2015). The appeal of being real: Gender differences in the components of state authenticity. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Philadelphia, PA.

Kreiger, T. C., Fadden, D. L., Rosbrook, K. Y. and Specht, S. M. (2014). Death and sports: Neglected components of contemporary measures of nostalgia. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Boston, MA.

Lundquist, A.R., Lefebvre, E.J., and Garramone, S.J. (2014). Smartphones: Fulfilling the need for immediacy in everyday life, but at what cost? Article published in the
International Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, 4, 80-89.

Lundquist, A. R., Lefebvre, E.J., and Garramone, S.J. (2014). Smartphones: Fulfilling the need for immediacy in everyday life, but at what cost? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston, MA.

Lindsey, A., Corelli, M., Vomer, M. and Massey, A. (2013). A psychophysical method for the measurement of contrast sensitivity in tiger salamanders. Poster presented at the Association of Psychological Sciences Conference. Washington, DC.

Lundquist, A. R., and Garramone, S.J. (2013). Call me, text me, e-mail me…wherever I am! Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Humanities Council, Savannah, Georgia.

Wadas, M. J., *Scalise, A. M., Rivera, A. J., and Lindsey, A. E. (2011). Tiger salamanders are more sensitive to higher spatial frequencies and less sensitive to red/green visual stimuli following metamorphosis from aquatic into terrestrial phase. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 52, E-Abstract 1176.

Yanowitz, J.L., Broedel, M., and Yanowitz, K.L. (2011). Perceptions of courtship pursuit as a function of age. Poster presented at the Association for Psychological Science Conference, Washington, D.C.

Specht, S. M. and Wilkinson, T. N. (2010). The role of “nostalgia” in perception of artwork. Poster presented at the Annual Convention of the Association of Psychological Science. Boston, MA.

Wadas, M. J., Scalise, A. M. and Lindsey, A. E. (2010). Psychophysical measurement of visual Behavior in the aquatic-phase tiger salamander. Poster presented at the 21th Annual Convention of the Association of Psychological Science. Boston, MA.

Lindsey, A. E., *Politylo, B. C., and Rivera, A. J. (2009). Psychophysical measurement of color vision in neotenic tiger salamander. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 50, E-Abstract 2734.

Specht, S. M. and VanDewerker, E. N. (2008). The influence of artists' statements on perceptions of artwork. Poster presented at the 20th Congress of the International Association of Empirical Aesthetics. Chicago, IL.

Lindsey, A., Abdul-Salaam, O. Z., and Danilowicz, R. (2007). Behavioral Contrast Sensitivity Functions in the Neotenic Tiger Salamander [Abstract]. Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, 48, E-Abstract 1301. Poster presented at the Annual Conference of the Association for Research in Vision and Opthalmology. Ft. Lauderdale, FL.

Specht, S. M., Owens, G. W. and Lundquist, A. R. (2007). Experimentally-induced "color-blindness" and perception of artwork. Poster presented at the 19th Annual Convention of the Association of Psychological Science. Washington, DC.

Specht, S. M. and Freeman, S. L. (2006). Histaminergic antagonists appear to shift water intake patterns in humans. Poster presented at the 18th Annual Convention of the Association of Psychological Science. New York, NY.

Specht, S. M. and Poczatek, J. E. (2005). Successive contrast effects for judgments of abstraction in artwork. Paper presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Boston, MA.

Specht, S. M. and Cook, M. J. (2004). Kandinsky and “the Blues”: Chromatic associations with varying shapes. Poster presented at the 25th Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association. Chicago, IL.

Ginsberg, P.E. and Gekonge, M. (2004). MTV, technology, the secular trend, and HIV/AIDS: Why African parents need to learn about adolescent development. Dialectical Anthropology, 28, 353-364.

Alibegic, R. and Ginsberg, P. (2004). Can ethnic identity predict preference for magazine images in Bosnian adolescents. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Washington, DC.

Lundquist, A. R. and Asher, E. (2004). Self-determination predicts better coping with academic success impediments in college. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Society. Chicago, IL.

Lundquist, A. R. and Curtis, M. (2004). Effectiveness of on-line versus traditional study material in an Introductory Psychology course. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Society. Chicago, IL.

Ginsberg, P. E. and Lemire, D. (2003). Identity formation in Bosnian adolescent refugees. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Baltimore, MD.

Ginsberg, P.E. and Gekonge, M. (2003). MTV, the secular trend, and HIV/AIDS: Why African parents want to learn about adolescent development. Paper presented at the New York African Studies Association. Ithaca, NY.

Specht, S. M., Alberico, K. F., Maher, J. D. and Mastrangelo, L. E. (2003). Immediate and delayed taste contrast in younger and older adults. Paper presented at the 25th Annual Meeting of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences, Sarasota, FL.

Bauer, L. and Fragetta, C. J. (2002). Memory distortions in the courtroom: Putting memory on trial. In R. W. Flint, Jr. (Ed.), Forget It? Sources, Theories, and Mechanisms of Alterations in Mnemonic Function (pp. 51-78). North Chelmsford, MA: Erudition.

Foll, C. (2001). The influence of word relavence and multimodal presentation on recall. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Washington, DC.

Specht, S. M., Markiewicz, G. J. and Nardilillo, K. D. (2001). Successive taste contrast in humans using common foodstuffs as gustatory stimuli. Paper presented at the Eastern Psychological Association, Washington, DC.

Waterman, J. (2001). Effects of the media on the perception of current and ideal body image. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Washington, DC.

Martin, P. (2000). The relationship of locus of control to health and coping strategies during midterms. Poster presented at the Eastern Psychological Association. Baltimore, MD.

Contact Information

Office of Admissions

(315) 792-3006

Amy E. Lindsey, Ph.D.

Chair of Psychology
(315) 792-3806

General Information

Track

  • Major

Degree

  • B.A.
  • B.S.

Location

  • Utica Campus
Utica Excellence, Utica Value

Psychology at Utica

Career Opportunities

The psychology major provides a strong foundation for advanced study in the discipline, leading to rewarding career opportunities in:
    • Clinical and Research Psychology
    • Teaching
    • Social Work
    • Medicine
    • Law
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Options

Utica College's Psychology program offers two degree options - B.A. and B.S.
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Collaborative Research

Gaining a solid understanding and experience in conducting psychological research is an essential element of our program. The psychology faculty are actively engaged in various research activities and encourage student collaboration.

What You'll Learn

The psychology program at UC offers two degree options: Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. All of the traditional subdisciplines of psychology are taught, including developmental, social, learning/cognitive, biopsychology, clinical/counseling, and experimental methodology and analysis. This curriculum provides a broad background in psychology for those intending to pursue advanced studies, and general liberal arts education for students wishing to seek more immediate employment.

Online study at Utica College

Psychology Faculty

Psychology at Utica College

A Degree That Works

The psychology major prepares you for professional accomplishment in:

  • Mental Health Services
  • Assistance for individuals with developmental disabilities
  • Crisis management and substance abuse intervention
  • Business Management
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Psychology Faculty 2019

Exceptional Faculty

The dedicated faculty of the Utica College Psychology Department is committed to your success. With an unparalleled knowledge and expertise, they are accessible, easy to know, and fun to work with.

Psychology faculty and students

A Year To Remember

This brief retrospective takes a look back at a year (2018-19) in the life of the Utica College Psychology Department in photos, featuring conference presentations and other student/faculty achievements. 

View Presentation
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A Solid Foundation

All of the traditional subdisciplines of psychology are taught, including developmental, social, learning/cognitive, biopsychology, clinical/counseling, and experimental methodology and analysis.

Utica College

Laboratory Facilities

The Department of Psychology at Utica College offers two facilities for research and discovery:

  • Abe Judson Memorial Psychology Lab - features statistical and stimuli software on all computers
  • Animal Behavior Laboratory - located in Gordon Science Center, for research on behavior and visual perception
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International Honors

Psi Chi is the International Honor Society in Psychology founded for the purpose of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science of psychology. Psychology majors at Utica College who excel in their coursework and meet the requirements are invited to join Psi Chi. Students are considered every semester and those who achieve this honor are invited to our annual Induction Ceremony each Spring semester.

PSI CHI

Student Voices: Raneem Amra

A brief conversation with psychology major Raneem Amra, an international student from Palestine, about her program and her experience at Utica.

Student Voices: Kate Rosbrook

A visit with psychology major Kate Rosbrook, who was selected for a research assistantship at Yale School of Medicine’s John B. Pierce Laboratory substantially on the basis of the high-level skills and abilities she developed at Utica College.

UC Psychology Society 2

Psychology Society

Although consisting of predominantly psychology majors, this group is open to any student with a strong interest in psychology and topics relating to it. The purpose of the group is to search out careers and opportunities in, and become better acquainted with, the various fields of psychology and to promote understanding and cooperation between faculty and students in psychology.

PSYCHOLOGY SOCIETY
Academic Quad at Utica College

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