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Center for Small City, Rural Studies at UC Presents Talk on Urban Landscapes


Thomas to Speak on "The Good, The Bad, The Ugly"

Written By Colleen Bierstine '15, PR Intern

Talk is free, open to public

Contact
cleogrande@utica.edu

Utica, NY (04/09/2014)
- Alex Thomas, director of the Center for Small City and Rural Studies at Utica College, will present his talk “Urban Landscapes: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” on Wednesday, April 16.

With the rise o the automobile in America, the nation’s urban landscape entered into a period of experimentation as to how to accommodate the car into everyday life and architecture. The result has been a series of great innovations alongside some very ugly mistakes.

Thomas will lead a trip around the nation seeking out the good, the bad and the ugly in his talk. It will take place at 7:30 p.m. at The Other Side in Utica, 2011 Genesee St. It is free and open to the public.

Thomas graduated from UC with a bachelor’s degree in sociology in 1991, and a bachelor’s in history in 1992. He earned a Ph.D. from Northeast University in 1988 and is now an associate professor of sociology at SUNY Oneonta. Thomas’ current research focuses on the development of cities and their relationship to the hinterland in the Ancient Near East and the lessons to be learned for modern cities.

Thomas is the author of “Gilboa” and “In Gotham's Shadow,” written about Utica, Cooperstown and Hartwick, and he is the co-author of “Spotlight on Social Research” and “Upstate Down.” Thomas is also the author of several articles and presentations.

For more information, contact Alex Thomas at athomas@utica.edu.

About Utica College – Utica College, founded in 1946, is a comprehensive private institution offering bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. The College, located in upstate central New York, approximately 90 miles west of Albany and 50 miles east of Syracuse, currently enrolls over 4,000 students in 36 undergraduate majors, 27 minors, 21 graduate, pre-professional and special programs.