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About the Utica College Diversity Committee Design

  

As a whole


This design symbolizes unity, harmony, energy exchange, action, and vibrancy.  The circular nature of the logo as a whole represents infinity, as circles often do.  This means that diversity will never cease at UC.  Circles also represent protection and completion.  With the addition of the 3 half-circles representing embracing human UC diversity committee logoarms, the protection/completion meaning is multiplied. The white field in the middle represents neutrality, clarity and change.

Individual parts of the image


  • The red triangle in the middle represents action, as triangles are often associated with action. The red color represents love. Action and love are often what bind us together and makes change possible.
     
  • The three spheres in the middle are all the same color. In representing diversity, we think of the color of water, fluid and ever-changing, having no color but containing all the individual colors within it.  When we see a body of water, it reflects the sunlight and the view of its surroundings.  When water is in the form of mist or rain, it can display the diverse colors of the rainbow.  Drops of rainwater can refract and disperse the light in a similar way that a prism does.  Our diverse community can also come together for strength and change, and go out into the world to share and expand creative, life-giving light, and diverse ideals.
     
  • The spheres are in a triad as well. A definition of triad is: “the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one,” which for the Diversity Committee epitomizes the strength in the unity of individuals.
Meaning of colors
  • Red for love, passion, and vitality
  • Blue for trust, wisdom, and intelligence
  • Green for growth, harmony, and safety
  • Orange for joy, determination, and encouragement
  • White for neutrality, clarity and change
Designed for the Diversity Committee by Albert Orbinati, 2009