Tips For Scheduling Classes

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via cooltext.com

I know it might be hard to believe, but we’re less than a month away from the end of the fall semester. With that said, scheduling classes for the spring semester is right around the corner.

Even though you may still be focused on wrapping up the fall semester, it’s important to get a head start in figuring out which courses you’re going to take in the spring. Here are two tips for scheduling classes:

Get your core requirements out of the way

I’m not a huge fan of math. Sadly, this doesn’t exempt me from taking math courses.

Check your degree evaluation, figure out which classes you’re not thrilled about having to take, and get them out of the way as soon as possible. Instead of putting the class off until your junior or senior year, just get the class out of the way in your freshman or sophomore year so you could take a major-related course instead.

Core requirements range from math and history to philosophy and lab sciences. The number of required courses varies from one college to the next, but you should try to take most of these classes during your first two years so you can concentrate on your major later.– via College Board

Create a schedule that fits you

If you’re not a morning person, try to avoid taking some classes in the morning. The same could apply to night classes.

Don’t overlap classes. Remember, you’ll need enough time to hike from one class to another. Also, be careful not to schedule all your classes on the same day. Instead, spread them throughout the week so you have plenty of study time as well.– College View

Spring registration opens on November 17th, and if you haven’t done so already, try to meet with your advisor.

Scheduling issues will inevitably happen, but by staying prepared, you’ll avoid it!

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It’s All a Balancing Act!

College isn’t just about attending classes; there is so much more that goes along with it! On top of classes, there are social events to attend, organizations to be a part of, homework to be done, and downtime to be had! The trick is figuring how to balance all of those things without letting another thing fall to the side, which can be tricky sometimes! So, this post is going to teach you how you can marathon your favorite Netflix show on Saturdays, attend your organization meetings on Wednesdays, and still have time to turn in that huge paper due Friday.

My trust planner that I use everyday
My trusty planner that I use everyday

Write it down! If you have an assignment due, write it down. Don’t count on the syllabus for all of your deadlines! Sometimes things change, you lose a paper, or you just forget to check your syllabus one night and miss a due date. Make sure to have important deadlines written down somewhere close!

Plan it out! If I have a particularly stressful day, I’ll write out a to-do list for that day.  Sometimes, it will only be the due dates of various papers or a test date coming up, but other times, it may be where I am supposed to be at what time. For busy days, I’ll map out where I need to be each hour just so I don’t forget something important.

Sometimes I'll throw a small to-do list with places that I need to be, just so I don't forget
Sometimes I’ll throw a small to-do list with places that I need to be, just so I don’t forget

Color-Coordinate! (Or find a way to group things) I personally have everything written down in my planner, and I highlight each thing according to what grouping it falls under. Pink is for tests, yellow is for assignments, green is for job times, and so on. Find a method that works for you in order to keep everything separate.

A typical month. I try to always write down what's coming up, but sometimes forget. The colors help me keep track of what's going on.
A typical month. I try to always write down what’s coming up, but sometimes forget. The colors help me keep track of what’s going on.

Take advantage of technology! Some of the organizations I am a part of on campus opt to use “Google calendar,” and notifications can be sent right to a person’s phone when there is a meeting. Do that for assignments! I personally have an iPhone and just tell Siri to remind me to do things. One of my friends makes fun of me because of how specific some of my reminders are! One time, we went to lunch and she got a tuna sandwich. She had leftovers but didn’t want it to stink up her car, so she put it in her trunk. However, she was scared that she would forget the sandwich, so I made a reminder that, “There is a tuna sandwich in your trunk. Take it out or it will smell and you will cry. Remind me at 2:30. Honestly, in my opinion, the more specific the reminder the better.

Plan out free time! Often, when people write to-do lists, they only list what needs to be done, which can be helpful. However, if you don’t give yourself breaks every so often, you may go slightly crazy. Planning to watch your favorite television show at 8 or go to the gym can help you to remember that it is important to actually do so.

My favorite thing to see
My favorite thing to see

Prioritize! If you have a whole week’s worth of assignments that you are attempting to do at once, start with what is due the earliest and then work toward the other assignments. For my own to-do lists, I always rank them in the order they are due, so I know which to complete first.

Know when to work or relax! I have a rule that I never do homework on Friday nights, unless I’ve done something relaxing before I do it. I go to class all morning and work both of my jobs on Fridays, so by the time 6 p.m. rolls around, I am pretty beat. Typically, on a Friday, I’ll go out to dinner or grab a coffee with a friend to de-stress a little from the week. It’s important to know your limits, and not push yourself too far. Also, I do homework and try to study all other nights of the week, so taking a little extra time on a Friday isn’t a bad thing. On Sundays, I break up studying/homework with other things. I’ll try to devote a few hours to each.

My way of encouraging myself.
My way of encouraging myself-Put in right around midterms.

The main point of this blog post is to essentially find a way of organizing your life. It can be hectic having so many things to do all the time, but if you attempt to categorize and sort what is important, then you’ll have time for all of the things you want to do.

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Conservation Biology: One of My Favorite Classes

I’m a biology major and have taken loads of courses. Plus, I’ve enjoyed quite a few of them! However, I think if you find a class that you really love (and love learning about!), then that is something you should pay attention to.

I knew I was interested in conservation before I took Conservation Biology, an upper-level biology course open to bio majors. I’ve been a vegetarian since I was young, and I am thinking about pursuing environmental law when I graduate. I actually took this class because I thought my own interest in the subject would increase…and I was right! I love going to class and learning about issues I am passionate about. Plus, studying for tests isn’t so-so bad! (Tests are always a little nerve-wracking no matter the subject matter!)

Finding a class you really love can be spontaneous or can take a lot of thinking! As always, here are some tips and tricks to help you find a class you love just as much as I love conbio.

Think about what you want to do when you graduate. Are there any courses geared toward that area? I know your entire degree is focused on your post-graduation plans, but maybe there is a specific course that really focuses on it.

-Take a random course (or two!) There are always those courses that sound so cool…but  you don’t really need them for course requirements. If you have time, take one anyway! I know someone taking a literature course, and its focus is on the Harry Potter books. How cool is that? If you are a fan of the book, then the course may not even seem like that much work! There are loads of fun courses depending on your interests. Be sure to check out the course catalog and explore a bit.

-Take a course with a professor you like. If you had a professor in the past and enjoyed their teaching style, see if you can take something with them again. Some professors’ teaching styles do not mesh well with a student’s attention span, and I would suggest paying particular attention to how you learn. If you like a professor, chances are you might like the classes they teach…because of them!

-Look into one-credits. There are so many one-credit courses available to students in a myriad of topics. Look into the music, fitness, art etc. offerings, and try one of them out. Typically, one-credit courses are only half a semester, so you don’t have to devote too much time to the material.

Taking courses should not always be a chore. Find some that are fun for you!

 

 

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Feeling Burned out? The End is Near

By this time in the semester, I know I am usually burned out and ready to go on Winter Break.

Midterm Week is over, and finals are approaching very soon. The bittersweet feeling of the semester being over and the school work coming to an end for winter break leaves a weird feeling in my heart. For some of us, this is the last semester of our college journey, and for the rest of us, we are coming a step closer to being the person we want to be and completing our degree. Holding on to these moments and experiences is important. Even though it may seem stressful now, being self motivated and continuing to push forward will get you to where you want to be.

Here are somethings that I do when I feel burned out: 

  1. I go to the gym

– A good work out is always a good way to release stress and anger.

2. Go for a walk

– There is nothing strange or awkward about going on a walk alone. Sometimes, you need to hear yourself think.

3. Go for a spa day/personal mall day

– Go to the mall and treat yourself to a personal day. There is something about shopping, eating and pampering myself that always gets me in a good mood. Also, it is something that makes me feel in control.

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COM 130: My Experience in My Favorite Class

As a PR major, I am so fortunate to be able to dabble in all different types of classes. This semester, I was so nervous to take the WPNR Practicum. The thought of having my own radio show for an hour was crazy.

I never pictured myself as the DJ type of girl. Sure, I could play the music easily, but could I talk? What on earth was I supposed to say on the air? How would I sound? What if I messed up? Those were just some of the thoughts that ran through my head, and that was just on training day! 

Picture Courtesy of the WPNR Facebook Page
Picture Courtesy of the WPNR Facebook Page

The first day that I was on air I totally didn’t expect much of anything. I figured that I would play the music, introduce an artist or two and that would be it. However; I was liking what I was doing!

As the weeks went on, I became more comfortable and I realized that I truly enjoyed this radio gig! Of course, I have a huge support system of family and friends who listen every week and always manage to give me positive feedback, so they always boost my confidence!

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I now find myself really excited for Friday mornings. I love the music I play, I love getting the opportunity to let my voice be heard, and I love the fact that I step out of my comfort zone more and more each week.

I never imagined that this would become my favorite class, and I never expected how sad I would be to see it end. Taking this class has taught me so much about myself and what I truly am capable of!

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Time to Pick New Classes. Again.

Registration is coming up for next semester (November 17th is a little less than a month away!) I’m sure you’ve given thought as to what classes you are going to take. However, if you haven’t,  I suggest running a degree evaluation (in bannerweb) and figuring out what courses you still need in order to obtain your degree.

I’m sure you think this post is a little early, however, you can never start planning your next semester early enough! Here are some tips and tricks to help you make the most of your next semester.

Are you dreading a class? Take it as soon as you can! Don’t put anything off because you’ll have to take it eventually! Why dislike a class your last semester of senior year? If one of your requirements scares you (like physics scared me!) then be proactive. Find out about tutoring opportunities before you even need them, and use them! I asked my friend last semester if he would be tutoring for physics just because I knew I would need the help!

Plan accordingly! Are you not a morning person? Check out which classes are going to be offered when and have a game plan for when it is your day to schedule classes. Don’t waste time on the day you can register by trying to figure out times, have that all done before! Just go through and register. Nothing stinks more than when you’re stuck taking an 8:30 because the 11:30 section filled up while you were trying to figure your schedule out.

Find when classes are offered! Do you need a course that is only offered a certain semester? Or once every other year? Plan ahead for those special courses well ahead of time. If a course is only offered every other spring semester, make sure you know when that is and register for it! Don’t waste an opportunity to take a course you may not have another chance to take! Also, if any of those special courses are specifically required for your degree, pay extra close attention to when they are offered.

Know yourself and the classes! Don’t over or under load yourself. There is a precious balance (that can be hard to find) when registering for classes. If you are anticipating a certain course to be extremely hard for you, then maybe hold off on another super difficult course. You want to make sure you have enough time to devote to all of your classes, and some classes take more time than others. You don’t want to spend all of your time on one thing and not have enough for another extensive course.

Speak with your advisor! Every student has to meet with their advisor in order to receive their PIN so they can register. However, don’t only go to them for that. Advisors are professors who are there to help and assist you! Ask them for opinions on what you should take and bounce potential schedules off of them to see what they think. Definitely listen and value their opinion, but remember that the ultimate decision is your own. You have to do what is right for you.

I hope you follow my tips and tricks and start thinking about those classes for next semester soon! It is closer than you might think!

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12 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me About College

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Most of our knowledge comes from experience. That’s why a lot us will look back on events in our lives and say things like, “If I only knew then what I know now.” We tend to think about things in retrospect – what we could have done better if we had known more at that present time. But of course, this never really does us any good because, try as we might, we can’t go back to those moments.

Now that I’m about to graduate this semester, I have been thinking of a lot of things that I wish I knew going into college, things I wish someone had told me. Although, even if someone had passed this knowledge my way then, would I have listened? Who knows? My hope is that, in sharing these tips with you, you’ll trust me and take it to heart so you can get the most out of your time and money.

  1. Take the classes that matter to you.
    I am going to be completely honest. Every semester, when it came time to build my schedule for the next semester, I focused only on a) what was required to graduate, b) what was most convenient time-wise, and c) what was easiest. This worked out to make my time here quite efficient, but all of a sudden, it dawned on me that I have taken all of the classes that I will take.
    I wonder if I missed things. I took a couple easy A courses, but did I take things that would be practical and applicable? Yes, but not as many as I could have. Do whatever you can to broaden your horizon now. Take communication, business and writing courses, no matter what your major is. These will help you so much. Then be sure to fit in things you find interesting.
  2. Class attendance is crucial, but your health is the most important thing.
    This past semester, I got hit with mono. It took me a week or two to get diagnosed, but I knew something was severely off. The type-A part of me was saying, “Go to class!” But my body was physically incapable of movement. I did the right thing and went to the doctor instead of class, then brought my professors a doctor’s note. When you have a serious illness like mono, you have to put your health first.
  3. The best way to do well in a group project is to take charge.
    We all know that, despite professors’ best effort, group work is never an equal division. And if you don’t get to pick who you’re working with, there’s no guarantee the people you work with have the same work ethic or concern for their grades as you do. Therefore, if you want to do well on a group project, the only way to do so is suck it up and take the reigns. You need to be in control, be responsible, and be aware of dates and requirements. As harsh a reality as it is, that’s just group work for you.
  4. Your professors want you to succeed.
    It feels like they’re out to get you when they hand you a research paper assignment, but I swear, they want to see you do well. They will do everything in their power to help you if you show you’re willing to work and to reach out to them.
  5. Make time to see your family.
    A lot of kids want to get away from their families when they go off to college. And even if that wasn’t the case for you (it wasn’t for me; I didn’t want to leave), it’s likely you’ll assume you have your entire life to visit your family, and you won’t make it a priority on breaks. The thing is, life is going to keep changing and more and more things will get in the way of spending time with them, whether it’s jobs or distance or whatever. Take the time while you have it and be with your family as much as you can.
    rehearsal
  6. Get at least one person’s phone number in every class you’re taking.
    This will come in handy on many levels. If you’re stuck in traffic and going to be late, you can text someone and ask them to let the professor know (make sure you pull over to do this though!). If you miss a class, you can reach out to them for notes. If you’re confused about something, you can ask them for clarification.
  7. Pens exist only to be sucked into a black hole when you’re not looking.
    Seriously, buy a million, because they’ll all be gone in a week, even if you don’t lend them to people.
  8. Learn to cook.
    This is for men and women. People like people with food. It will help you take care of yourself, make friends, get on professors’ good sides, and you’ll look smooth on dates.

    A Loaded Cheese Fries Grilled Cheese from my blog.
    A Loaded Cheese Fries Grilled Cheese from my blog.
  9. You really need to check your email.
    Ask any professor; students don’t check their emails. That’s because our generation is accustomed to texts, and email seems like a thing of the past. However, you have to remember that your professors still use email avidly. It never fails that the one day you don’t check your email is the one day you got a class cancellation notification, but missed it and drove to school for nothing. Plus, you need to look out for weather and campus safety updates. All kinds of important stuff goes to your UC email.
  10. Establish credibility with your professors.
    This is especially true for professors you know you’ll have again. Even if someone rubs you the wrong way, you want to be on their good side. Prove to be diligent, motivated, and responsible by consistently handing assignments in on time, showing up to all classes on time, and participating in class. Always hand in your best work and be friendly. That way, when an unfortunate circumstance does happen, your professor trusts you and is willing to work with you. For example, I got rear-ended on the way to a midterm a few semesters ago, and was consequently a few minutes late, but my professor knew what kind of student I was, and he understood.
  11. You are never “too busy,” so ditch that excuse.
    The saying is true: if you really care about something, you’ll find the time for it. When you tell someone you were “too busy,” you really just didn’t see the thing you didn’t do as priority. I don’t care how much crap you take on – I’m the queen of taking on too much – you will find a way to do what matters to you.
  12. It never hurts to ask.
    A lot of people refrain from asking for something they want/need if they’re sure the person will say “no.” I have always adopted the mantra that it doesn’t hurt to ask, and it’s almost always been helpful to me. When I’m feeling like things are going south in a class, I see if there’s anything a professor can do to help me, even if I think they’ll say “no.” Nine times out of ten, I get surprised. The same goes for anything. I’ve expressed to professors that the whole class could benefit from a couple days extra of studying and gotten tests moved back. This semester, an incredibly understanding professor was willing to work with my teaching schedule at the gym. People will surprise you, and if they say no, so what? You should ALWAYS ask.
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20 Things That Inevitably Happen When It’s Your Last Semester

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My big girl backpack.

Fingers crossed, I should be graduating in December. Am I excited? Yeah. Am I scared? Terrified. It’s taken 3 1/2 years, but I have realized several things this semester. In fact, I’d say this was the first semester I finally felt like I knew what I was doing. Now, why couldn’t that have happened sooner?

These are a few of the things I’ve noticed now that it is my last semester here.

  1. You’re outraged when you have to do a big project or paper because you’re just so over the whole thing.
    speech
  2. No one, and I mean no one, can match your procrastination skills.
  3. You’ve started making sleep a priority again because you’re basically an old person now.
  4. Everyone on the planet wants to know what your post-graduation plans are.
  5. Seriously, that is the only thing anyone wants to talk to you about anymore. Um, hello, can we talk about something happier, like food?
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  6. You’ve realized your “I’m in college” excuse time frame is dwindling, and are therefore milking it for all it’s worth while you can.
  7. You’re trying not to countdown, but it’s impossible.
  8. You’ve mastered the art of doing as much as possible with as little effort as possible.
  9. You’ve convinced yourself there’s some way to avoid entering the real world. I can win the lottery in the next three months!
  10. People have decided it’s their business where you’ve applied to, how many jobs you’ve applied to, and how every bit of your job search is going.
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  11. You finally know your best, most efficient study methods.
  12. You don’t understand how you’re about to adopt an adult life when you still feel like a child.
  13. Your mind is so far ahead of you that you keep forgetting it’s only October, and you still have schoolwork to complete.
  14. You’ve become an expert schedule builder, learning to craft schedules according to your own preferences.
  15. Professors, co-workers, and loved ones make (mostly) empty threats about sabotaging your grades so you can’t graduate yet.
  16. You don’t remember how you were ever able to get up so early in high school. It’s 10 a.m. classes and later all the way.
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  17. If you stacked up all the revisions of your resume, you could build a skyscraper.
  18. You laugh at the juniors who are freaking out about their graduation, as if THEY have it bad.
  19. When you go to events that alumni attend, you can’t help but think how you’ll be one of them soon.
  20. You’re both ready and not ready at the same time.

Fellow seniors, what worldly knowledge have YOU garnered?

Note: all photos were taken & edited by me. The watermark “SCC 2014” refers to my personal food blog, The Smart Cookie Cook.

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10 Words to Eliminate From Your Writing

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Created by: Pixlr Express

As a public relations and journalism major, there is one thing that I have learned to do, and that is simply to de-clutter my writing.

Writing for social media outlets, newspapers, e-mails and essays all have one thing in common: keep it short and sweet, yet descriptive and detailed. People want the story, the facts.

We have all had to write those dreaded research papers or meet some sort of word count. We eventually run out of information and begin to “fluff up” and colorize our papers with unnecessary words.

Want to keep it simple? Want to give your message and your paper more meaning? Want to make your paper more collegiate? Avoid these overused words.


  1. Amazing: Yes, “amazing” is a great descriptive word, but only for certain situations. This word has been overused so many times that it really has lost its luster and appeal. Look for a synonym to be more creative. Is everything really amazing?
  2. Awesome: This goes hand-in-hand with the word amazing. It’s been so overused that “awesome” is boring. It’s not descriptive enough, and can be viewed as a sarcastic response to something.
  3. Maybe: When writing a paper, particularly an opinion paper, you want to try to avoid this word. “Maybe” sounds like you are unsure of your answer. Why? Just be straightforward.
  4. Very:  This is often used for emphasis of something. However, “very” is very vague. For example: “The weather was very cold today.” Cross it out. It’s not needed and is definitely not the most descriptive word out there. Try thinking of another word that may impress your professors.
  5. Perhaps: I am so guilty of using this word too much. Perhaps, like maybe, just goes to show that you’re not sure of your answer. It almost indicates a question in the reader’s mind that says, “Are they confident about their response?”
  6. Just: In my opinion, this word is simply a filler for a sentence. It doesn’t particularly add anything, so why bother putting it in?
  7. Really: Another common word that we’re all guilty of using too much. Similar to “very,” this word is used for emphasis, yet completely lacks emphasis altogether. There are much better words to describe something. It’s a weak word.
  8. Literally: This word kind of annoys me. It adds absolutely nothing to a sentence. What’s the difference between “I literally drove all night,” or, “I drove all night?”
  9. Like: I know “like” is used for comparison, but it is to the point where it’s so overused these days. Starting a sentence off with “like” is a big NO simply because it sounds a bit immature.
  10. Good: “Good” isn’t great at all. It’s non-descriptive, non-informative, and it leaves the reader lacking information.

Avoiding these words will help improve the quality of your paper. I know that it is so tempting to use them, but seriously, put yourself in your readers’ shoes. Do you want to keep their attention? Do you want them to get the gist of the story without looking for more?  Be creative! Look for synonyms that make the reader visualize what your paper is all about.

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A Double Major and a Dual Degree: What is involved?

As someone who is currently in their final year here at UC, I thought I might be able to give some unique insight into the majors I am enrolled in for those who have yet to declare a major. In addition to that, I thought it might be important to touch on the possibility of completing a minor, dual major, or dual degree for those who have already declared a major, as well as those who haven’t. The experience can be enriching and quite rewarding if you have the time and dedication in order to do it well.

Personally, I am completing a dual degree in Psychology and Business Management, and I can tell you from experience that both programs are great. Initially, these two programs seem somewhat divergent, however when you get down to the bare bones of both programs you can begin to see a good amount of overlap. This fact is especially true in my case, when you consider that I am completing a concentration in Marketing as part of the Business program.

The Business Management program prepares students for a multitude of different management positions. The classes center around the various aspects of creating, running, and sustaining a business. These range from classes in Economics, Finance, Accounting, and Risk Management Insurance; to classes in Marketing, Human Resources, and even some in Entrepreneurship. The ultimate goal of the program is to prepare students to set out into the real world and succeed in whatever business path they choose to pursue. The professors in the program all hold either Doctorates in their field, or extensive years of critical experience working for actual companies and corporations. This type of real world experience allows the professors to give examples from their own experience in relation to the course material. The best aspect of the program is that it equips you with critical skills that can be applied to any workplace you choose. Just about every workplace needs managers who can put the company on a path toward success. A degree in management can quite literally be applied to any profession that you can imagine, if you take the proper steps.

Likewise, the Psychology program also has a lot to offer to anyone who enrolls. Within the Psychology program you will be exposed to a multitude of disciplines within the area of psychology. Classes range from Statistics and Research Methods, to Counseling, Psychobiology, and Cognitive Psychology; among so many more. The Psychology program allows students to chart their path towards a career in Psychology, whether that career is in Counseling, Clinical Psychology, or Research. A degree in psychology can also open doors into related careers in which a background in psychology could be useful; these careers might include Forensic Crime investigation and Marketing, along with a host of other careers. Each of the professors in the program hold a Ph.D. in their respective field of psychology, giving students access to a veritable treasure trove of knowledge.

When I was first applying to colleges I was split on whether I wanted to pursue a degree in Psychology or one in Business Management. This is where the opportunity to complete a double major came into play. By opting to double major, I was able to gain knowledge in both fields that I could apply towards deciding what to do after college. As I said before, I was lucky that my two interests fit together so well. That being said, even if your interests don’t necessarily converge, you should still look into a double major or at least a minor if you have another interest besides your declared program. Not only does this allow you to pursue valuable knowledge, it also makes you more marketable to employers. At a base level, if your future employer sees that you completed an extra major or minor, this indicates to them that you are well-rounded and well-educated. Additionally, it might also indicate that you are a driven individual, and that you are not afraid to take on a challenge. Moreover, the additional major or minor may be a key aspect they were searching for in an employee. For example, if you are a Business Major, it may be beneficial to complete a minor in one or more foreign languages. This way, when applying for jobs you have the added selling point that you are experienced in a number of foreign languages and can communicate with international customers or international business partners.

As I said before, I am completing what is called a dual degree. Completing a dual degree requires good time management skills and the ability to plan ahead in order to make sure you take all your required classes, however if you are willing to put in the effort, this can be a worthwhile venture. There are several distinctions between a double major and a dual degree. When completing a dual degree you are required to complete an additional 30 credit hours of course work in any classes that you choose, bringing the total up to at least 150 credit hours of work upon graduation. Luckily, you can utilize transfer credits from another university or from high school in order to supplement the required credit hours. Additionally, you cannot choose two BA programs or two BS programs; rather one must be a BA and the other a BS. The main distinction between a double major and a dual degree is the outcome. Upon completing a double major you will receive a degree in one of your chosen majors, and the other will be noted on your transcript and you can list it as such on applications. Upon completing a dual degree, you will receive a degree from both majors and can list either or both on your application as such. In simpler terms, with a double major you receive one Bachelor’s degree with a notation of an additional major, and with a dual degree you receive two Bachelor’s degrees. This can be helpful when applying for jobs, as you can fall back on either degree in the event that you cannot find a job. In other words, it gives you some wiggle room when searching for jobs so that you are not locked into one field or the other.

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