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Brown Bag Lunch: History of Revolutionary Russia


UC Prof DeSimone to Discuss Russian Empire

Written By Tyler Gardinier '14, PR Intern

Focus on Russian history between Revolutions

Contact
cleogrande@utica.edu

Utica, NY (11/11/2013)
- On Wednesday, Nov. 13, the history brown bag lunch lecture features UC’s own Assistant Professor Peter DeSimone and his lecture titled, “Old Ways in Modern Russia: Defining the Russian Orthodox Old Rite on the Eve of the Revolutionary Russia.”

In the period between the Revolutions of 1905 and 1917, Imperial Russia and its inhabitants found themselves facing an unknown social and political future ultimately creating a new crisis of identity within the Russian Empire.  DeSimone looks at how the breakaway Russian Orthodox groups collectively known as Old Believers, or more properly Old Ritualists, responded to the dramatic changes around them.  Of particular interest to all of the new social, cultural, and political groups in post-1905 Russia was the attempt to best define and envision Russia's new future.  The Old Believers proved to be no exception as with their new freedoms they collectively not only sought to add their voice to Late-Tsarist politics but define their movement's own history, faith, identity, and future in their new Russia.

The history brown bag lunch lecture holds talks on the second Wednesday of each month at 12:30 p.m. It will be held in in Hubbard Hall, room 202, and is free and open to the public.

For more information on the history brown bag lunch lecture, contact David Wittner, professor and chair of history and international studies, at dwittne@utica.edu.

About Utica College – Utica College, founded in 1946, is a comprehensive private institution offering bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees. The College, located in upstate central New York, approximately 90 miles west of Albany and 50 miles east of Syracuse, currently enrolls over 4,000 students in 38 undergraduate majors, 29 minors, 20 graduate programs and a number of pre-professional and special programs.