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Christopher A. Riddle
, Ph.D.

Department Chair

(315) 792-3759
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Philosophy

Course Descriptions

PHI 101 – Critical Thinking
(3) Y
Skills needed to read and write critically.
The different kinds of arguments and
their relative weaknesses and strengths,
strategies for arguing well and spotting
and avoiding common fallacies will all
be covered.

PHI 103 – Problems in Philosophy
(3) Y
A critical study of the problems that
have inspired philosophers and the solutions
they have found. Subjects tackled
include human nature, ethics, and the
nature of knowledge.

PHI 104 – Philosophy of Religion
(3) Y
Examination of some of the philosophical
issues raised by religion. Arguments
for and against the existence of God, the
nature and role of religious experience,
the connection between ethics and religion
and the language we use to talk
about religion.

PHI 107 – Ethics
(3) Y
A critical and historical study of the
major ethical theories from the period of
Plato to the present. Analysis also of
problems present in the construction of
ethical theories, the nature of moral
judgment, and moral evaluation.

PHI 108 – Professional Ethics
(3) Y
This course examines ethical dilemmas
encountered by professionals at work.
Journalism, health care, law, education,
computer science/information technology
and public relations all provide
examples.

PHI 200 – Great Philosophers
(3) IR
An introduction to the major theories of
a few selected great philosophers from
the classical, modern, and contemporary
periods. Selection of philosophers subject
to change periodically. May be
repeated once.

PHI 205 – History of Ancient Philosophy
(3) O
A study of the development of philosophy
from the period of Ancient Greece
to the beginning of the Christian era
through analysis of selected problems
and theories.

PHI 206 – History of Modern Philosophy
(3) O
A study of the history of philosophy
from the Renaissance to the present
through an analysis of selected problems
and theories.

PHI 221 – Scientific Method
(3) IR
Basic theoretical principles of modern
scientific method including: explanation,
deduction, induction, analogy, facts,
hypotheses, mathematical truth, probability
causality, and determination.

PHI 300 – Contemporary Philosophy
(3) IR
A critical and comparative study of
important philosophical contributions
within the contemporary period. May be
repeated for credit if successive offerings
cover different philosophies.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PHI 305 – Ethical Issues in Contemporary
Science and Technology

(3) IR
Students are introduced to ethical Issues at the intersection of contemporary politics, science and culture.  The course focuses on how technological changes have affected our conception of human beings.

PHI 315 – Theories of Knowledge
(3) IR
A critical examination of the theories
which have arisen in the history of philosophy
with regard to the nature of 
knowledge and belief. Prerequisite:
Philosophy 101.

PHI 317 – Theories of Art
(3) IR
Introduction to aesthetic theories from
Plato to the present. Prerequisite: permission
of instructor.

PHI 325 – Medieval Philosophy
(3) IR
A critical study of the major philosophical
problems of medieval philosophers
from Plotinus to William of Ockham.
Emphasis on such problems as the relation
of faith and reason, God and creation,
knowledge and science, realism
and nominalism.

PHI 345 – Political Ethics
(3) IR
A critical study of problems and theories
in social philosophy from Classical
Greek thought to the present.

PHI 365 – Theories of Value
(3) IR
A critical examination of philosophic
theories purporting to deal with the
nature of value in general, the nature of
evaluative or normative criteria, and the
manner in which the latter are determined.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PHI 375 – Symbolic Logic
(3) IR
A study devoted to the construction of
systems of logic, formal systems of
proof, and their application to various
subject matters. Prerequisite: Philosophy
101 or permission of instructor.

PHI 335 – Philosophy of Law
(3) IR
The writings of both classical and contemporary legal philosophers are studied.  Issues examined include: What is law?  What is the relationship between legal and moral obligations? Is imprisonment justifiable?

PHI 385 – Healthcare Ethics
(3) IR
Designed to benefit healthcare professionals, this course explores current issues in medical ethics.  It focuses on development of moral reasoning and decision making skills, and on the relationship between ethical theory and medical policy.

PHI 400 – Advanced Topics in Philosophy
(3) IR
Individual study of a particular philosophy,
philosophical movement, or problem.
Individual investigation on the part
of the student directed by an instructor.
Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

PHI 425 – Theories of Justice
(3) IR
This course examines how various classical, modern, and contemporary writers have interpreted the concept of justice as it relates to the life of the individual and the effective functioning of society.

PHI 490 – Readings in Philosophy
(3) IR
Individual study of a particular philosophy,
philosophical movement, or problem.
Individual investigation on the part
of the student directed by an instructor.
Philosophy majors only. Prerequisite:
permission of instructor.

PHI 503 – Environmental Ethics
(3) IR
Topics covered include the relationship between environmental and traditional ethics, the nature of value, and interconnectedness in ethics and nature.

PHI 504 – Evolution and its Discontents
(3) IR
An examination of the foundations of Neo-Darwinism; its application to ethics, religion, sociology, psychology, and philosophy; and criticisms of the theory.

PHI 505 – Ethical Issues in Contemporary
Science and Technology

(3) IR
Students are introduced to ethical Issues at the intersection of contemporary politics, science and culture.  The course focuses on how technological changes have affected our conception of human beings.


Note: The figure in parentheses following the title of the course indicates the credit hours per term. Courses that extend through two terms are shown as follows: (3, 3). Courses that are one term only are shown by: (3). Courses with variable credit are shown with the range of credit available, for example: (1-6).

Letters appearing after course credit hours in this section are explained as follows:
S=Spring
IR=irregularly
F=Fall
U=Summer Session
Y=at least once each academic year Check schedule for Winter Session
O=every other year

The College reserves the right to cancel any course if registration does not justify continuance and to make changes in curricula at any time.