Contact

Judith A. Kirkpatrick
Provost

(315) 792-3122

Core Curriculum

Core (31-55 credits)

         The program seeks to provide students with educational experiences that will develop their ability to think clearly and critically, to express themselves accurately, and to become aware of the rich and varied areas of knowledge.  Concepts introduced in the Core will be reinforced and developed through each student’s chosen course of study.
            The faculty has identified 10 goals of core.  These goals will be introduced at a foundational level in the Core but are intended to be reinforced and assessed throughout the curriculum.  Three of the goals will be addressed specifically in major and major-related course work.
            The following list outlines the academic groups from which students may select courses to fulfill the requirements, and the numbers of all courses that have been approved as Core courses.  For descriptions of each of these courses, see the “Courses of Instruction” section of this catalog.  Some Core courses satisfy major and major-related courses or prerequisites for those courses.
           

Component One: Foundations of Understanding (0-24 credit hours)

      
 
I.               Written Communication ……………..            6 credits*
 
Goal 1: Students will demonstrate the ability to write logically, clearly, precisely and persuasively through accurate reading and observation; and to acquire, organize, present and document information and ideas.
 
The following courses are intended to provide a foundational understanding of Goal 1:
     
ENG 101: Written Communication I..…………………...3 cr.
ENG 102: Written Communication II…………………...3 cr.
or demonstrated competence leading to exemption. (See General Education Core Exemption Criteria in this section of the catalog.)
 
*Some students may be required to take ENG 100 in addition to Core requirements.
 
II.             Oral Communication …………………           3 credits
 
Goal 2: Students will demonstrate the ability to speak logically, clearly, precisely and persuasively through accurate reading and observation; and to acquire, organize, present and document information and ideas.

The following courses are intended to provide a foundational understanding of Goal 2:
 
COM 101: Interpersonal Communication ………………………………….…3 cr.
COM 103: Public Speaking …………………………………………………...3 cr.
THE 136: Elements of Acting …………………………………….…………..3 cr.
or demonstrated competence leading to exemption. (See General Education Core Exemption Criteria in this section of the catalog.)
III.           Foreign Languages ………….……….  6 credits
 
Goal 3: Students will demonstrate competency in a language other than English and an appreciation of the culture of its native speakers.
 
The following courses are intended to provide a foundational understanding of Goal 3:
 
Beginning Foreign Language I  (101 level)…………………………….…....3 cr.
Beginning Foreign Language II  (102 level)…………………………………3 cr.
or demonstrated competence leading to exemption. (See General Education Core Exemption Criteria in this section of the catalog.)
 
IV.           Quantitative Reasoning ……………..6 credits*
 
Goal 4: Students will demonstrate proficiency in mathematics and an understanding of quantitative reasoning.
 
The following courses are intended to provide a foundational understanding of Goal 4:  Students should select two of the following courses, at least one of which must have MAT as a prefix:
 
ECN 241: Statistics **………………………………….…………..………….3 cr.
MAT 104: Intermediate Algebra ………………………….…………………..3 cr.
MAT 107: Introduction to Mathematics …………………….……………...…3 cr.
MAT 112: Basic Statistics**……………………………….…………..…...…3 cr.
MAT 131: Plane Trigonometry……….……………………..………………...3 cr.
MAT 143: Mathematical Analysis for Business and Economics I ………..….3 cr.
MAT 151: Pre-Calculus …………………..……………..………………....…3 cr.
MAT 201: Calculus I ……………………..…………………………….….…,3 cr.
PSY/SOC 211: Statistics in the Behavioral Sciences**…………………….…3 cr.
 or demonstrated competence leading to exemption. (See General Education Core Exemption Criteria in this section of the catalog.)
 
* Some students may be required to take MAT100 in addition to Core requirements.
**only one of these courses may be taken for credit
 
V.             Computer Use ………………………..1-3 credits
 
Goal 5: Students will demonstrate skill in using digital technology, such as computers and the Internet, to gather, analyze and present information.
 
CSC 117: Microcomputers and Application Software ………………………. 3 cr.
      CSC 118: The Internet: Information Retrieval and Organization ……………..3 cr.
 
or a course designated by the student’s major to be taken before the end of the sophomore year ……………………………….……………………………1-3 cr.
or demonstrated competence leading to exemption. (See General Education Core Exemption Criteria in this section of the catalog.)
 
For Biology majors this goal is satisfied by taking both of these required courses:
BIO 231: Research Methods in Biology I ………………………………3 cr
BIO 232: Research Methods in Biology II …………………………...…3 cr
 
For Construction management majors this goal is satisfied by taking all of these required courses:
CMG 103 Introduction to Construction Management……………………3 cr
CMG 117 Construction Graphics and Applications ………….………… 3 cr
CMG 221 Methods and Materials I ………………….…………………. 3 cr
CMG 223 Surveying ……………………………………………………. 3 cr
CMG 331 Estimating I ………………………………………………….. 3 cr
CMG 332 Estimating II …………………………………………………. 3 cr
 
 

Component Two: Understanding from Multiple Perspectives (25 credit hours)

 
VI.           Humanities …………………………..  9 credits
 
Goal 6: Students will demonstrate an understanding of literary and fine, visual, or performing arts and their cultural context by expressing an informed response to artistic creations.
           
One course from each of the following two categories will begin the development of those capabilities required to achieve Goal 6.
     
Literature  
ENG 135: Introduction to Literature …………………………………….……3 cr.
ENG 145: Literature in Focus ………………………………………………… 3 cr
ENG 195: American Literature and Culture …………………………………..3 cr.
ENG 245: Major Figures in English Literature: Through the 18th Century…...3 cr.
ENG 246: Major Figures in English Literature: Since the 18th Century…....…3 cr.
ENG 295: Major Figures in American Literature: Colonial Times – 1865 ….3 cr.
ENG 296: Major Figures in American Literature: Since the Civil War …….. 3 cr.
LIT 205: Masterpieces of Western Literature: Through the Renaissance……..3 cr.
            LIT 206: Masterpieces of Western Literature: Since the Renaissance ………..3 cr.
           
Fine, Visual, and Performing Arts
FIA 115: Introduction to Art ………………………………………………..…3 cr.
FIA 245: History of Art I………….………………………………….……..…3 cr.
FIA 246: History of Art II……………………………………………………...3 cr.
MUS 115: Introduction to Music……………………………………………....3 cr.
MUS 245: History of Music I………………………………………….……....3 cr.
MUS 246: History of Music II………………………………………………....3 cr.
THE 115: Introduction to Theatre……………………………………………..3 cr.
 
Goal 7: Students will demonstrate the ability to develop a critical perspective, to analyze and evaluate arguments, and to use arguments to arrive at rationally justified belief.
 
One course in Philosophy/Semiotic Systems will begin the development of those capabilities required to achieve  Goal 7.
 
ENG 103: Introdution to the English Language …….………….……………..3 cr.
PHI 101: Critical Thinking  …………………………………….……………..3 cr.
PHI 103:  Problems in Philosophy …………………….……….……………..3 cr.
PHI 104: Philosophy of Religion ……………………………….……………..3 cr.
PHI 107: Ethics ………………………………………………………………..3 cr.
PHI 108:  Professional Ethics …………………………………..……………..3 cr.
PHI 205: History of Ancient Philosophy ……………………….…………….3 cr.
PHI 206: History of Modern Philosophy ……………………….…………….3 cr.
VII.      Natural Sciences ……………….…………            7- 8 credits
 
Goal 8: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method of inquiry and/or standard experimental techniques and knowledge of the natural sciences
 
One course from two of the following categories  (one course must be a four-credit laboratory course) will begin the development of those capabilities required to achieve
Goal 8.
 
Biology
BIO 101 and 102: Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II*….……….……..4 cr.
BIO 111/111L: Human Ecology …………………………………………3 or 4 cr.
BIO 112/PSY207: Human Sexuality ………………………………………....3 cr.
BIO 113: Human Genetics …………………………………………………....3 cr.
BIO 211: General Biology I ………………………………………………..…4 cr.
 
*both courses are required to receive core credit
 
Chemistry
CHE 103: Chemistry and Society …………………………………………….3 cr.
CHE 105: Chemistry of Everyday Things……………………………….. 3 or 4 cr.
CHE 211: General Chemistry I …………………………………………….…4 cr.
 
Environmental Science
ENV 201: Introduction to Environmental Issues ……………..………………3 cr.
 
Geology
GOL 105L: Society, Earth, and the Environment ………………………3 or 4 cr.
GOL 115: Elementary Oceanography ……………………..…………………...3 cr.
GOL 225: Physical Geology …………………………………….....……………..4 cr.
GOL 226:  Historical Geology ………………………………………....………...4 cr.
 
History and Philosophy of Science and Technology
HPS 126: The Rise of Modern Science: Aristotle to Newton   ………………3 cr.
 
Physics
PHY 116: Astronomy: A Study of the Universe ……………………………...3 cr.
PHY 123: Physics for Liberal Arts …………………………………………....3 cr.
PHY 151: General Physics I: Mechanics, Heat, and Waves ………………….4 cr.
PHY 163: How Things Work………………………………………………….3 cr.
PHY 261: Physics I ……………………………………………………….…..4 cr.
 
VIII.       Social Sciences ……………………….….  9 credits
 
Goal 9: Students will demonstrate an understanding of history and heritage; the individual, culture, and society; and social institutions and processes. 
 
One course from each of the following categories will begin the development of those capabilities required to achieve  Goal 9:
 
History & Heritage
                  ANT 251(D): Native American Culture and History ………………………...3 cr.
HIS 126: America 1500 to 1877 ....................................................... 3cr
HIS 127: America 1877 to Present ……….…………………………………….3 cr.
HIS 135(D): Africa and the World….……………….………………………..3 cr.
HIS 145(D): Asia and the World… …………………………………………..3 cr.
HIS 165(D): Europe and the World…………………………………………..3 cr.
 
 
Social Institutions and Processes
                        ECN 141: Principles of Macroeconomics ……………………………………3 cr.
                        GOV 101: Introduction to Politics and American Government ……..………3 cr.
GOV 261: International Relations…………………………………………… 3 cr.
IST101(D): World Regional Geography .……………………………………3 cr.
           
The Individual, Culture, and Society
ANT 101(D): Introduction to Anthropology …..……………………………………3 cr.
PSY101: Introduction to Psychology …………………………………………3 cr.
SOC 151(D): Human Society …………………………...……………………3 cr.
 
 
Goal  10: Students will develop an awareness of and an appreciation for the importance of interacting effectively with people of diverse backgrounds.
 
One course with a D (Diversity) designation will begin the development of this awareness. Courses with a (Diversity) D designation can be found in the Schedule of Classes.
 

Component Three: Integrated Writing (6 credits)

 
·      6 credits …. two courses designated as writing intensive after a student has completed 27 credit hours. *
 
*Three credits for transfer students who transfer with core complete.


General Education Core Exemption Criteria 

For details about exemption procedures, consult with the coordinator of the relevant department.


Goal I – Written Communication


ENG 101: For exemption from ENG 101, students must provide the Basic Studies Committee with three college-level essays and an impromptu piece of writing that demonstrate the student’s ability to write clearly organized, thesis-oriented essays. Essays will be judged on their clarity, organization, development, focus, coherence, thesis, and mechanics. 

ENG 102: For exemption from ENG 102, students must provide the Basic Studies Committee with four well-organized, thesis-oriented essays, including an impromptu piece of writing and three collegelevel essays, at least one of which demonstrates the student’s ability to write an organized, coherent research paper that correctly utilizes the conventions of one of the standard methods of documentation. Essays will be judged on their clarity, organization, development, focus, coherence, thesis, mechanics, research, and documentation.



Goal II – Oral Communication



Exemption from the oral communication requirement shall be granted by providing demonstrated competence in one or more of the following ways:
  1. Proof of coursework or other significant structured learning that provided both 
    experience in oral communication (skill development) and in the theoretical foundations of the field;
  2. Written testimony by qualified persons acquainted with the applicant’s experience 
    in both the performance and theoretical aspects of the field;
  3. Other forms of proof (portfolio, taped performance, etc.) that attest to the applicant’s experiences in, and knowledge of, the field.

At the discretion of the faculty, some form of presentation may be required in addition to the above criteria.
 

Goal III – Foreign Languages

Students who have achieved an A average with three years of high school language or a B average with 4+ years are exempt from 101 and 102. Those with three years and an B average are placed in 102. Two or fewer years with up to a B average are placed in 101. Native and bilingual speakers are evaluated
on a case-by-case basis.

Goal IV – Quantitative Reasoning

Students who achieve a score of 70 or above on the Math Placement Test are exempt from three credits in Goal 4: Quantitative Reasoning. Exempted students may not take MAT 104 or MAT 151 for credit.

Goal V – Computer Use


Any student who wishes to be exempt from Goal V: Computer Use must achieve a passing grade on the computer proficiency assessment test or show evidence of computer proficiency.

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